GALLERY: Cornwall's 12 Remarkable Days of Winter

Magicseaweed

by on

Updated 288d ago

Last week, we unleashed just a taste of how it's been in the South West UK these past 12-or-so-days. Those back-to-back swells hammered into just about everywhere in western Europe but for the likes of England and in particular, the south west – it made for 12 days of basically non-stop surf. And that is something to celebrate.

If you missed out on everything Euro swell these past two weeks, check Norway HERE, Portugal HERE a mid-swell Kernow check in HERE the Canaries (aka European Pipeline) HERE, Morocco HERE. Oh we could go on!

First came Storm Barra, December 7.

First came Storm Barra, December 7.

© 2022 - Mike Newman.

The north coast of Cornwall though was kissed by this long period swell over multiple days from December 7 right through to the 19th. Sure, some meant finding shelter from a strong enough offshore to almost scupper proceedings but for the most part, things were...fun, the water warm (alright, not warm, but toasty enough to stick to a decent 4mm), the sand banks were incredible at some spots, with a handful of hollow, heavy waves thrust in for good measure.

Isaac Marshall.

Isaac Marshall.

© 2022 - RT Shots.

"Around the beginning of December the general flow pattern in the North Atlantic switched from a ‘blocking’ pattern, with a large anticyclone occupying almost the entire ocean and not allowing any decent storms to develop, to a ‘fluid’ pattern, with a strong north-south pressure gradient and a succession of low pressures tracking from west to east," says MSW forecaster Tony Butt. "The all-important upper airstream, which pumps energy into the surface layers and also controls the trajectory of surface storms, gained strength and took on a west-to-east orientation. In short, you could say the North Atlantic had been ill for a while and then suddenly became much healthier.

Couple lines way down west.

Couple lines way down west.

© 2022 - RT Shots.

"Around the 7th and 8th December, a large, tight area of low pressure deepened west of Ireland and generated a huge, short-lived pulse of swell and some ragged local conditions. While this swell was fading away, two more low pressure systems were forming. The first one began to deepen in the Labrador Sea around 8th, and then tracked across the northern half of the North Atlantic. The strong, moving fetch on its southern flank generated a long-period pulse of swell that arrived around 10th.

Mid-Cornwall on the pump.

Mid-Cornwall on the pump.

© 2022 - Tom Vaughan.

"The second system appeared near Nova Scotia on 9th and quickly moved northeast, expanding and intensifying as it became entrained into the westerly flow associated with that first system. By 11th it was a huge storm centred southwest of Iceland, with a massive area of storm-force winds on its southern flank. Open-ocean wave heights over 40 feet covered a large area northwest of Ireland. A huge swell hit northwest Ireland on 12th, and a smaller, long-period pulse of swell arrived in Cornwall between 12th and 14th.

Jake Sage.

Jake Sage.

© 2022 - RT Shots.

Storm Corrie followed a few days later.

Storm Corrie followed a few days later.

© 2022 - Mike Newman.

"Over the next few days, a ridge of high pressure began to expand from the Azores towards the northeast, extending over Britain and Ireland. At the same time, another two low pressures formed on the far side of the Atlantic. Both systems formed northeast of Newfoundland, and tracked towards Iceland, with a moving area of strong winds generating swell. The main bulk of the swell travelled northeast towards Iceland and the Faeroe Islands, with tangential swell expanding out towards the east and southeast. Between 15th and 19th, local conditions were very good, with light to moderate winds from the south or southeast, and wave heights remaining around the three to five foot mark."

And there's more on the way too. Keep your eyes peeled for a Christmas swell alert, soon.

George Carpenter.

George Carpenter.

© 2022 - Carpysurfphotos.

Adam 'Bearman' Griffiths, moonwalking.

Adam 'Bearman' Griffiths, moonwalking.

© 2022 - Luke Gartside.

Luke Dillon, up high.

Luke Dillon, up high.

© 2022 - Luke Gartside.

Newquay Golf Club over looks one of England's more famous rugged big wave spots, the Cribbar.

Newquay Golf Club over looks one of England's more famous rugged big wave spots, the Cribbar.

© 2022 - Luke Gartside.

Few of the meatier days last week set off a number of tucked away numbers.

Few of the meatier days last week set off a number of tucked away numbers.

© 2022 - Luke Gartside.

Young legend, Lukas Skinner.

Young legend, Lukas Skinner.

© 2022 - Luke Gartside.

© 2022 - Luke Gartside.