Gallery: Teahupoo Thunders and its Crown Prince Shines Bright

Jason Lock

by on

Updated 15d ago

This month has seen the South Pacific go kinda crazy. Swells filling into Mexico, central America and of course, when we see those numbers blip up from down there, we turn our attention to Tahiti – namely, Teahupoo. You see, the southwest Pacific is the driving force for swells to fire up that hyper wave. So this weekend, while most eyes were glued to the insanity over at Puerto Escondidio, Chopes finally came alive.

Not exactly 'code red' levels of going off, no, no, but certainly a solid pulse for the Polynesian islands, one that we haven't seen the likes off from this season so far. There's been a couple solid days, mind, but this is what many are calling the first official day of power at the end of the road.

Forecast: Teahupoo

Haumana O'Connor.

Haumana O'Connor.

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet

Prince of Teahupoo, Matahi Drollet, was the standout on Saturday (as you can probably tell by the cover shot) but we understand he got injured and had to miss yesterday's thumping session -- and then the swell killed off pretty quickly.

This is Matahi's kingdom.

This is Matahi's kingdom.

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet

Anyway, with the complexity of the south Pacific and swells hitting Mexico and Tahiti and Hawaii, we asked MSW forecaster to break down what's been going on here. “This swell originated from a low that deepened southwest of New Zealand on Tuesday May 18, and moved in a north-easterly direction towards the middle of the South Pacific,” he said.

Teiki Charles.

Teiki Charles.

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet

“An area of strong southwest winds on its northwest flank that moved with the system for about 48 hours generated a large pulse of southwest swell.

Eimeo Czermak.

Eimeo Czermak.

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet

“The first long-period components of the swell arrived in Tahiti on Friday, with periods of up to 20 secs. The swell began to fill in properly by late Friday, hitting eight feet or more by Saturday morning and persisting throughout the day. Wave heights continued around the eight feet range through Sunday, with the swell starting to lose its punch by late afternoon. Winds were light to moderate from an easterly quarter throughout.”

Ian Fontaine.

Ian Fontaine.

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet

Yeah, it got big.

Yeah, it got big.

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet

© 2021 - Romuald Pliquet